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My puppy ate half a king sized chocolate bar, help!?


It was Hershey’s white chocolate cookies ‘n creme, but a king size, I had eaten half of it and wrapped it up and put it on the table: he jumped on the couch and onto the table and ate the rest! He’s only 6th months old, Carin Terrer/Shih Tzu mix, just below 10 pounds. Will he be okay??

http://www.monmouth.army.mil/monmessg/newmonmsg/mar172006/m11dogs.htm I checked that site, but I couldn’t understand the amount of chocolate as to the dog’s weight.

Please help? I’m really worried!

Seriously? That site shows simple ratios.

For white chocolate, the toxic level is 200oz per 1lb of your dog. Your dog would have had to eaten 2000 oz of chocolate. It’s highly unlikely your chocolate bar is 4000oz. 2000oz is 250lbs.

For milk chocolate, it’s 1oz per lb of your dog’s weight. That would mean 10oz for your dog. 10oz is a little more than half a pound.

Added: If the dog didn’t come close to eating these levels, the dog doesn’t need to go to the vet. All the vet will say is &quot:watch her&quot:. Feed your dog some extra food, as much as she can safely eat, and keep an eye on her.

Take him to the vet and they are goin to make throw up all the chocolate or he might die

most of the time when animals eat chocolate they die sooner or later and how did you puppy get to your candy bar exactly

I doubt half a bar would have done anything, but if you want to be on the safe side-Take puppy to vet.

Animals often have a &quot:sweet tooth&quot: too
Just like their human counterparts, pets, especially dogs, can crave the delicious goodness of chocolate. While recent studies have shown that chocolate may be beneficial for our health, it is important to know that chocolate can be toxic, and sometimes even fatal, for animals.

Dogs are most commonly affected, due to their ability to find it and the common ‘sweet tooth’ they seem to have. It is important to remember that cats and other species are susceptible to the toxic effects of chocolate, too.

What makes chocolate toxic, anyway?
Chocolate is made from the fruit (beans) of the cacao tree. Theobromine, a component of chocolate, is the toxic compound in chocolate. (Caffeine is also present in chocolate, but in much smaller amounts than Theobromine.) Both Theobromine and Caffeine are members of a drug class called Methylxanines.

Theobromine and caffeine effects on the body:

•Central Nervous System (CNS) stimulant
•Cardiovascular stimulant
•Increase blood pressure (mild)
•Nausea and vomiting
Are some chocolates more toxic than others?
Yes. Unsweetened (baker’s) chocolate contains 8-10 times the amount of Theobromine as milk chocolate. Semi-sweet chocolate falls roughly in between the two for Theobromine content. White chocolate contains Theobromine, but in such small amounts that Theobromine poisoning is unlikely. Caffeine is present in chocolate, but less than Theobromine.

Quick Guide for Theobromine levels in different types of chocolate:
From The Merck Veterinary Manual, here are approximate Theobromine levels of different types of chocolate:

•Dry cocoa powder = 800 mg/oz
•Unsweetened (Baker’s) chocolate = 450 mg/oz
•Cocoa bean mulch = 255 mg/oz
•semisweet chocolate and sweet dark chocolate is = 150-160 mg/oz
•Milk chocolate = 44-64 mg Theobromine per oz chocolate
•White chocolate contains an insignificant source of methylxanthines.
Source: Merck Veterinary Manual Online

How much is too much?
The toxic dose of Theobromine (and caffeine) for pets is 100-200mg/kg. (1 kiliogram = 2.2 pounds). However, various reports by the ASPCA (American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals) have noted problems at doses much lower than this – i.e. 20mg/kg.

Translated to a &quot:typical&quot: scenario, and using the 20mg/kg as a measure of &quot:problems can be seen at this level of ingestion&quot:, a 50 pound dog would have to consume 9 ounces (+/-) of milk chocolate to consume the 20mg/kg amount of Theobromine. Some dogs won’t see problems at this rate. Some may.

This is a much more conservative toxic level calculation than the &quot:standard&quot: of 100-200mg/kg, but better safe than sorry. A dog sneaking a couple M&amp:M’s shouldn’t have a problem, but it isn’t a good habit to get into!

What are the signs of toxicity?
Signs are most commonly seen within 12 hours (or less) of chocolate ingestion.

•Excitement / nervousness / trembling
•Vomiting / diarrhea
•Excessive thirst / sometimes excessive urination (at higher levels of Theobromine toxicity)
•Muscle spasms
•Seizures
•Coma (rare
•Death (rare) — likely due to heart rhythm abnormalities.

How is chocolate toxicity treated?
If you suspect that your pet has eaten chocolate (more than the stray chocolate chip that fell on the floor), call your veterinarian for advice. The toxicity of Theobromine is dose dependent. This means that the size of your pet, the type of chocolate, and quantity of chocolate determine if or how toxic it is for your pet.

There is no specific antidote for Theobromine toxicity. Medical treatmentis supportive, and may include all or some of the following:

•IV fluids – to prevent dehydration from vomiting, diarrhea, and /or increased urination, and to &quot:flush&quot: the Theobromine out of the system.
•Emetics – medications that induce vomiting. Used when the ingestion of chocolate is within 4 hours. Up to 6-8 hours post chocolate ingestion may be effective.
•Activated charcoal – for ingestion greater than 4 hours prior to treatment, or for patients that show continued signs of toxicity.
•Anti-seizure medications – for patients having seizures and/or muscle tremors.
•Cardiac medications – for patients exhibiting irregular heart rates or rhythms.
Why isn’t chocolate toxic to humans?
Humans can break down and excrete Theobromine much more efficiently than dogs. The half life of Theobromine in the dog is long: approximately 17.5 hours.

Keep your pet’s best interests at heart…chocolate wasn’t meant to be shared anyway (grin

take him to the vet hurry!!!! they can check for unusual bumps in his tummy (so he vomits there not in ur house lol)

call your vet.

he will be fine…puppies can handle anything.

call your vet!!!! (please lol)

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